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Some Logic

A new illustrated book by Rop van Mierlo looks set to be as successful as the Design Academy Eindhoven graduate's first.  "Some Logic" presents a whole new set of animals to young and old readers alike using the same wet paper and paint technique introduced in "Wild Animals".

By Gabrielle Kennedy / 06-03-2014

When we first discovered Rop van Mierlo back in 2010 he had just released “Wild Animals”, but it was only stocked in a very few select and high-end children’s boutiques. 

It wasn’t long, however, before every parent with an aesthetic eye and a respect for printed images was trying to get a copy.   Blogs went crazy for the stunning edition with its amorphous illustrations and open story line.

The book was published in Dutch, English and French, and as of the end of last year 9000 copies were in circulation.  It was a stunning success for the Design Academy Eindhoven graduate who was nervous about sticking to his own ideas, which back then he told me “might be too simple.”

The success put pressure on Van Mierlo not to find another good idea – he already had plenty – but to maintain the level of perfection.  “I knew I needed to create something that was at least as good,” he says.

Before “Wild Animals” Van Mierlo wanted to create a book about insects, but by the time he sat down to think about his second book, his fascination with insects had waned.  “So I began laying out a book that I thought would be something completely different,” he says.  “I combined a lot of ideas, threw a lot of them out again, and developed the theme while working.”

Now Van Mierlo is ready to release his new book. “Some Logic” takes the creative approach of “Wild Animals” and ups the ante. The book mysteriously opens with a blank page with just the text “Japan is a great country” printed across the middle. It’s a curious statement that leaves the reader wondering.  

“A lot of times in (children's) book the title is repeated two or three times before you really get to the story,” Van Mierlo explains.  “I think that's weird, so I wanted to put something else there … and I once read an article about how Japanese designers use the grid in a more intuitive way.  They are not as strict and I thought that would fit just fine.”

“Some Logic” looks to be another stunning presentaion of new animals with a more ambitious mix of colours details.  To get it just right, each animal needed between four and sixty attempts.

The book closes with a poem written by Jan Willem Sterenborg.  “I sent him my notes for the book,” explains Van Mierlo.  “In the notes were also a lot of loose words, which were more for me personally.  Jan Willem almost only used those words for the poem.”

A
s
clouds
they drift
across the moon
the animals
sucking
their thumbs
listening
to
Matisse
comforting
his empty
bed
by
whispering
.
.
one
size
fits
all

"Some Logic" will be launched with an accompanying expo FRiday March 14 from 5pm to 9pm.The Lobster House
Frederiksplein 6 - 8 hs
1017 XM Amsterdam